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Welcome

Contacts

Events

Symposium

Education Guide

Recreation Guide

Newletter

Archive

salmon

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----- Education Guide: Invasive Species -----


WISP

WISP is a group of organizations and individuals concerned about the threat of invasive plants in the Westfield River Watershed. The goal of our partnership is to promote cooperative efforts to manage invasive species and protect native habitats in the watershed, through education, early detection, eradication, and management. Our steering committee has representation from The Nature Conservancy, Massachusetts Audubon Society, The Trustees of Reservations, Westfield State University, Westfield Wild and Scenic, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, and United States Fish and Wildlife, among others. Take a look at our brochure for more information.

Get involved!
Do you want to combat the spread of invasive species in your community? We are looking for community representatives to help organize or carry out activities to reduce invasive species in Westfield Watershed towns. There are many ways to get involved. A few possibilities:
  • Host a "Tupperweed" party with 5 or 6 friends and neighbors to learn hands-on invasive plant identification from one of our biologists.
  • Help organize an invasive species removal project in your town.
  • Come to a presentation to learn about invasive identification, and begin monitoring trails or roadsides in your town for invasive plants.
Why are we concerned about invasive species?
Invasive species (including insects like the Emerald Ash Borer and Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, and plants such as Garlic mustard, Japanese knotweed, and Glossy buckthorn) negatively impact our native plant and animal communities. These impacts result from competition for light and water, predation on native plants, and alteration of soil chemistry. The damage to our native species and habitats can be long-lasting and expensive to mitigate. Once established, invasive infestations can be difficult to remove, and costly to landowners. Monitoring for invasive species and catching infestations early provides enormous environmental and economic benefits.


Invasive Species Identification
  • Check out our LEAST WANTED posters to see some of the worst invaders in the watershed.
  • The Invasive Plant Atlas of New England provides an on-line guide to invasive plants in New England.
  • Report invasive plant species you find on EDDMaps, or use your SmartPhone to report sightings through OutSmart Invasives. Help us get a picture of what invasive plants are in the watershed!
  • Key Invasive Species of Southern New England can be found in this booklet.

Invasive Species Management
Questions? Ideas? Want to get involved? Contact us via our email address: wrwisp@gmail.com, or call (413) 628-4485 (x3). You can also visit us on Facebook.




 
| Water/Power | Fish | Agriculture | Forestry | Nature Places | Invasives |
| Recycling |Museums | Curricula | Grants | Govt Agencies |